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Vermont Fish and Wildlife | Hunter education courses offered | Community-news

MONTPELIER — Vermonters must pass the basic hunter education course before they can purchase their first hunting license. Vermont’s volunteer hunter education instructors are now holding a limited number of courses throughout the state. “Most of these courses are held in August and September,” said Vermont Fish and Wildlife’s Hunter Education Coordinator Nicole Meier. “All of our instructors are volunteers. They teach because they are passionate about hunting and want to ensure that Vermont’s safe hunting legacy continues. We credit Vermont’s strong safety record with our volunteer instructors — in fact, in 2021, Vermont boasted zero hunting-related incidents. “Volunteer instructors are the backbone of the Vermont Hunter Education Program. They are vital to Vermont’s strong record of safe hunting. Hands-on and in-person learning from an experienced instructor are the best ways to become familiar with the skills associated with safe hunting.” Courses are now available in basic hunter education, bowhunter education, trapper education and combination hunter-bowhunter education. More classes are to be posted in August and September. The courses will be listed as they become available on Vermont Fish and Wildlife’s website vtfishandwildlife.com. On the Home page, click on Hunt and then Hunter Education and Find the Right Class for You. To register for a course, visit register-ed.com/programs/vermont. A Vermont hunter education card entitles people to hunt in all 50 states, as well as some international locations. Requests should be made as early as possible. Send an e-mail to Nicole.Meier@vermont.gov or call 802-828-1193.

Guided walk in Guilford includes historic Carpenter House | Community-news

GUILFORD — Guilford Cares will sponsor a Carpenter Hill Trail Walk on Tuesday, Aug. 9, beginning at 10:30 a.m. Put on your sturdy walking shoes and come explore the grounds surrounding the historic Carpenter House at the top of Carpenter Hill Road. The guide, Karen Murphy, will lead participants on a loop walk through the woods, a small hay field and apple orchard, then back to the front of the house by a pond, stone walls and gardens. For those interested, there is a nearby cemetery with gravestones dating from the 1700s to the present, including that of Ben Carpenter, the second Lieutenant Governor of Vermont. Murphy will be able to point out other notable stones and facts as well. The Carpenter Hill House is 1.4 miles up Carpenter Hill Road from Guilford Center Road. Park in the driveway or in the pull-off a hundred yards further down the road. Watch for announcements of two more monthly walks in Guilford in mid-September and mid-October. Contact Guilford Cares, 802-579-1350 or guilfordcaresvt@gmail.com for more information or to request a ride.

Community park taking shape in Guilford | Local News

GUILFORD — A crew from Vermont Natural Homes recently delivered and assembled timber frames for a pavilion for a new new Guilford Community Park. The timber frame pavilion will be 24×48. The pavilion is phase one of the Guilford Community Park project which will also include the seventh circuit labyrinth play spaces, a basketball area, and and possibly EV charging stations. The plan is to have the pavilion ready and raised by sometime this fall. Close A crew from Vermont Natural Homes assembles the timber frame that will be the roof for the new pavilion of the new Guilford Community Park on Wednesday, June 29, 2022. The pavilion will be erected sometime in the fall. A crew from Vermont Natural Homes assembles the timber frame that will be the roof for the new pavilion of the new Guilford Community Park on Wednesday, June 29, 2022. The pavilion will be erected sometime in the fall. A crew from Vermont Natural Homes assembles the timber frame that will be the roof for the new pavilion of the new Guilford Community Park on Wednesday, June 29, 2022. The pavilion will be erected sometime in the fall. A crew from Vermont Natural Homes assembles the timber frame that will be the roof for the new pavilion of the new Guilford Community Park on Wednesday, June 29, 2022. The pavilion will be erected sometime in the fall. A crew from Vermont Natural Homes assembles the timber frame that will be the roof for the new pavilion of the new Guilford Community Park on Wednesday, June 29, 2022. The pavilion will be erected sometime in the fall. A crew from Vermont Natural Homes assembles the timber frame that will be the roof for the new pavilion of the new Guilford Community Park on Wednesday, June 29, 2022. The pavilion will be erected sometime in the fall. A crew from Vermont Natural Homes assembles the timber frame that will be the roof for the new pavilion of the new Guilford Community Park on Wednesday, June 29, 2022. The pavilion will be erected sometime in the fall. A crew from Vermont Natural Homes assembles the timber frame that will be the roof for the new pavilion of the new Guilford Community Park on Wednesday, June 29, 2022. The pavilion will be erected sometime in the fall. A crew from Vermont Natural Homes assembles the timber frame that will be the roof for the new pavilion of the new Guilford Community Park on Wednesday, June 29, 2022. The pavilion will be erected sometime in the fall. A crew from Vermont Natural Homes assembles the timber frame that will be the roof for the new pavilion of the new Guilford Community Park on Wednesday, June 29, 2022. The pavilion will be erected sometime in the fall. A crew from Vermont Natural Homes assembles the timber frame that will be the roof for the new pavilion of the new Guilford Community Park on Wednesday, June 29, 2022. The pavilion will be erected sometime in the fall. A crew from Vermont Natural Homes assembles the timber frame that will be the roof for the new pavilion of the new Guilford Community Park on Wednesday, June 29, 2022. The pavilion will be erected sometime in the fall. …

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Michael Roberts to bring thoughtful songs, ‘ambient moments’ to Retreat Farm | Arts And Culture

PUTNEY — When Guilford musician Michael Roberts brings new songs to his band, he finds they often take on a life of their own. This was the case with the slow, searching “Two White Tails,” which he names among his favorites on his album “Sympathizer,” released in February of this year. “It’s really nice to play music with people, because you have a certain idea about what the song is going to sound like or feel like, and when I played that with the musicians on the album, it kind of took on a different life than I had expected,” Roberts said in a phone call this week. He said the song took on a quality “like it was falling apart at times.” “Like a fragile — not fragile emotional state, but kind of searching, emotional state, to just not have concrete ideas about things, but to just be in a place where you’re not sure how you feel about what’s happening, and you’re searching and you’re staying open to possibility,” he said. “We kind of captured that feel organically.” Roberts will bring this musical dynamic to Retreat Farm Friday, when he and fellow Vermont musician Ali McGuirk co-headline a concert in Next Stage Arts’ Bandwagon Summer Series. Efforts to reach McGuirk were unsuccessful before press time. The show is at 6 p.m. at 40 Farmhouse Square, Route 30, in Brattleboro. Tickets are $20 in advance and $25 at the door. Children 12 and under are free. Advance tickets are available online at nextstagearts.org. Many of the songs on Roberts’ album were recorded at Guilford Sound, with a few recorded on cassette around his home. “I just liked that lo-fi sound of cassette tapes,” Roberts said. “I like the really nice quality on the other recordings, too. I think they balance each other to bring different feelings to songs.” Roberts said he looks forward to the way the songs evolve when performed live. For example, some of the “droney, synthesizer elements will be turned into more longer, freeform ambient moments in the live set.” “The album is more, really song-focused and the live set will be songs with these kind of improvised, ambient moments, so it’s a really different live set than the album,” he said. “So that’s really fun for us.” At Friday’s show, Next Stage will provide a cash bar with beer, wine and cocktails, and food will be available. Audiences are encouraged to bring lawn chairs or blankets for outdoor seating on the field. For more information, visit nextstagearts.org or call 802-387-0102.

Guilford girl, dad had great time in Alaska | Sports

GUILFORD — Ava Joyal, who sold her Brattle Bears at the May 6 Gallery Walk in Brattleboro in order to raise money for her trip, recently returned home with her father from a ski jumping camp in Alaska. “Ava and Corey both said this was the best week of their lives and they’re already planning to go back next year,” said Alix Joyal, wondering if her 10-year-old daughter will invite her to go along in 2023. The Academy School student was a member of coach Todd Einig’s Junior Jumpers program last winter. She finished first at Mount Washington Valley in January and two months later won her class in Lebanon, N.H. Extremely thankful for everyone’s financial help to get her there, Joyal attended the camp in Anchorage from June 20-25. “Each day consisted of drills and exercises for agility, balance and endurance and also lots and lots of jumping. They played lots of frisbee, soccer and other games to keep the kids moving and energized,” noted Ava’s mom. Instead of snow, the kids were jumping on wet plastic that mimicked grass. The Guilford girl started on the 20-meter jump and eventually practiced on the 40-meter ramp. “It was a wild feeling to ski on fake grass,” Ava explained. Mid week, the father-daughter duo went on a super long hike to Portage Pass and the glacial lake. That day ended with a team barbecue. “There were ice chunks floating by,” Ava said after jumping in the freezing body of water with her dad. Shane Covey can be reached at scovey@reformer.com or 802-254-2311 X163. On Twitter: @ShaneCovey.

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